Links between Alzheimer’s, Dementia and Diet with PhD Candidate and Health Coach Diandra from That Science Couple
Social Security Benefits Strategy Explained, Best Age to File Social Security, Social Security Office Tips, Social Security Filing for Couples with Jim Blair
Charlotte Bayala on Caregiving for a Spouse Using Yoga and Meditation to Maintain Good Mental and Physical Health
Paul Tyler on All about Annuities and How They Fit Into Your 401K and Retirement Plans
Bryan Herdt on Everything You Need to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

#014

Links between Alzheimer’s, Dementia and Diet with PhD Candidate and Health Coach Diandra from That Science Couple

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“It's not the weight that you are when you have dementia, but it's the weight that you had during midlife. So doing diet and exercise changes, now, when you're younger, will help with that. But also, if you're already in the 55 and over, if you haven't had any symptoms of dementia, it's a great time to start. If you already have dementia, then you can still have it, the diet can help to slow the progression of it. So, it's really important, because we don't have any drugs on the market that can do that right now."

-Diandra from That Science Couple

Diandra from That Science Couple is a PhD candidate at the University of Wisconsin and health coach who researches the links between diet, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. This episode will give you an insider’s guide to why making dietary changes may give you the best shot to stop or slow brain-related decline, how you can help a loved one if you’re a caregiver for an Alzheimer's patient and how allergy testing, stress reduction, genetics and science-backed, evidence-based nutrition coaching can all play a vital role in brain health and aging.

Links between Alzheimer’s, Dementia and Diet with PhD Candidate and Health Coach Diandra from That Science Couple

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“We used to think that Alzheimer's was only about the plaques, the amyloid beta and tau tangles, but actually we found out that there's a lot of mixed pathologies. So, people that will have some vascular components and then some of these typical amyloid beta or tau presentations, those pathologies for Alzheimer's. And so we know that the diet can actually work through the cardiovascular pathway, so it can help improve your heart. And then it also will help improve the blood flow in your brain as well."

-Diandra from That Science Couple

“I think that it's never too late, so I'll just put that out there. As long as you're on this Earth, every day is an opportunity to contribute to your own health. So that's my tagline, is that every day you wake up, you can choose, do I want to have that bacon double cheeseburger? Or do I want to have some light pasta dish or something? So it doesn't have to be all or nothing. And that's the great thing about the MIND diet is that you can just do pieces that are accessible to you. So you don't have to be perfect. And it's not a fad diet. It's not a "I'm just going to do this for six months to lose weight and then I'm going to go off of it." So if you do go down the plant-based route, a lot of times people do lose weight, but I say it's more how you feel and not so much focused on the scale."

-Diandra from That Science Couple

00:00:00 Intro

00:02:29 Diandra intro, PhD in nutritional sciences

00:03:48 the MIND diet; Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay

00:04:48 Diet and Alzheimer's

00:07:00 Dementia and BMI

00:09:17 Early and late onset dementia factors

00:11:57 Plant-based documentaries and conversation

00:11:30 Dairy and the MIND and plant-based diets

00:15:41 Hemochromatosis, health and TMAO compounds

00:18:12 How caregivers can help dementia patients with diet

00:20:05 Coffee and Alzheimer’s risk

00:22:14 Caregiving Developing a dementia and Alzheimer’s friendly diet

00:24:11 Health coaching and nutritionists

00:26:27 When you know you need a health coach

00:27:35 Health coaching and allergy testing

00:30:56 SMART goals and health coaching

00:33:00 Meal planning

00:35:23 Evidence-based nutrition coaching

00:37:23 Health coaching process

00:42:34 Blood testing and essential vitamins

00:44:46 Show wrap

#013

Social Security Benefits Strategy Explained, Best Age to File Social Security, Social Security Office Tips, Social Security Filing for Couples with Jim Blair

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“I think the thing that people make their mistake on is not remembering, first of all, that this is a lifetime benefit. So, when I start my Social Security, I'm going to receive it the rest of my life. Now that's a good thing. You don't have to worry about the benefits ending because you ran out of money, but if you start benefits at 62, you're going to take a reduction anywhere from 25 to 30% reduction over what you would receive at your full retirement age. That reduction carries through for the rest of your life. So, you not only want to look at, is the amount of money I'm going to be receiving sufficient now, but what about in the future? And then tack onto that, the fact that if my spouse is going to step into my shoes when I pass away, how important are survivor benefits? And that's something that people just don't think about.”

-Jim Blair

Jim Blair is a thirty-five year veteran of the Social Security Administration and upon retiring, is now the Vice President and Lead Social Security Consultant at Premier NSSA. Jim is going to give us an insider’s view into the best way to maximize your Social Security benefits in retirement, spousal benefits, strategies for couples, how to use and interact with the Social Security Administration local office staff, what to watch out for, when you need to pull in a Social Security consultant and a whole lot more!

Social Security Benefits Strategy Explained, Best Age to File Social Security, Social Security Office Tips, Social Security Filing for Couples with Jim Blair

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“Overall, (the Social Security Administration is) a great organization. I'm not going to beat up on the folks I used to work with because I think they do a great job. They work really hard.

The issue that they are running into, and I think probably everybody is having this issue. A lot of people are retiring from the organization, people walking out the door with 30, 35 years of experience and service. And as the new people come in, they don't necessarily have a lot of the experience folks there with them. So, there is a little bit of a gap there, experience-wise. We do occasionally hear about some misinformation coming out of the local offices. It's not something you can't get fixed if that does happen. And we hate to hear when it does, but that's why it's also important to maybe talk to someone else, particularly if you have something a little different in your situation, that's not just I'm 62 and I'm going to take my benefits. But you want to make that plan and talk to someone outside of Social Security, probably before you file.”

-Jim Blair

“You have a small window of opportunity to change your mind. You have one year where you can tell Social Security, “Oh, I should not have applied. I want to withdraw my application.” Withdrawing your application is a pretty easy process. It's a one-page form you fill out, they're going to ask you why, but they don't care what the reason is. The tough part is though you must pay back every penny that they paid you, including money deducted for Medicare premiums, or money withheld for income tax if you have taxes withheld from your benefit. So, while you do have a year to change your mind, you also have to pay that money back. That's what makes it so important to make your decision based off a plan that you have made sure you looked at all your options, what's best for me?”

-Jim Blair

00:00:00 Intro

00:02:29 Social Security Office location overview

00:03:32 Jim and how he helps people decide when to take Social Security

00:04:27 What age to take Social Security

00:05:59 #1 mistake people make when to start Social Security benefits

00:07:31 Age 62 or age 70 Social Security benefits

00:08:17 Break-even point for waiting to elect Social Security benefits

00:10:04 Why people take Social Security at age 62

00:11:30 Is Social Security going broke?

00:14:35 Social Security strategy for couples

00:17:20 Social Security for couples close in age and farther apart

00:18:45 The importance of making a Social Security plan

00:21:08 Your local Social Security Administration office staff

00:25:04 Social Security Administration tips and tricks for using the local office location

00:27:01 Divorce, Ex-Spouses and Social Security benefits

00:29:18 Working while drawing Social Security

00:32:38 Undocumented immigrants and Social Security

00:34:26 Medicare and Social Security one time decision

00:37:26 DIY Social Security or hire a consultant

00:39:11 Social Security seminars

00:40:50 Questions to ask so-called Social Security experts

00:45:05 Last Social Security questions and show close

#012

Charlotte Bayala on Caregiving for a Spouse Using Yoga and Meditation to Maintain Good Mental and Physical Health

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“There are so many times where I'm like, "What if I just left?" It's weird because there's a lot of things with caregiving that they're unsaid because people are like, "I can't say this. People will judge me." And that's one of the things. I don't know a person who's found themselves deep into caregiving, overwhelmed, just feeling like crap and not thinking, even if it's for a split second, "If I could just go. If I could just go." And sometimes it's not, if I could just run away for forever, it's, "I just want to run away for like 10 minutes." So yeah. I think if anyone has been a caregiver for a long time and says that they've never felt that way, they're full of crap. There's just no way. It is so difficult.

Meditation creates resilience. So if you're someone who, let's say you go to a doctor's appointment with your person that you care for and they give you bad news. If you're a person that automatically you're stressed, you're overwhelmed, you're flustered. You can't even figure out how to get back home. If you were to begin to meditate on a regular basis, the next time that would happen, you would be a little bit more resilient. You would still get upset. You would still get stressed out, but you wouldn't be so flustered, and you'd be able to get back home. And the more you meditate, the better able you are to see what's happening in your life. But allow yourself to take a step back and say, "All right, this is what we're going to do." Instead of breaking down and falling apart, whenever anything is thrown at you.”

-Charlotte Bayala

Charlotte Bayala is Charlotte is a caregiver. She’s going to give us an insider’s view into her caregiving journey, how to prioritize yourself, your family, your activity, your mental well-being and your physical health.  Charlotte is a yoga instructor versed in meditation, breath control and she’s dedicated to helping other caregivers across the country navigate formal caregiving, informal caregiving, and everything in-between.

Charlotte Bayala Instagram

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Charlotte Bayala on Caregiving for a Spouse Using Yoga and Meditation to Maintain Good Mental and Physical Health

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“Don't be passive about asking for the help that you need. No matter if it's your family, if it's friends, or if it's because you need to have it contracted out. You need to know, "I can't cook for the next two weeks. I need help with meals." And you find one, the people that, that are actually people who like to cook, that gives that person an opportunity to shine in what they actually know how to do and like doing, and they're able to do it and help someone at the same time. You have to see what thing can you ask a person to do that will benefit them. It sounds weird. It shouldn't have to benefit them, but if you want them to really show up and do that thing, that you need them to do, if they have more of a why to do it, they're going to be more apt to do it.”

-Charlotte Bayala

“The hardest thing for caregivers to do is to advocate for themselves. For me, that's the hardest thing for me to get a person to do, to say, "I am worth the trouble to actually stand for myself, to create boundaries and to do things for myself that I need to do so that in the end, all these things are so that you can be a caregiver long-term," so when you start saying, "Well, I'm not enough. It's not that big of a deal," you're actually taking time away from you being able to just enjoy time with that person that you're caring for.”

-Charlotte Bayala

“I think what surprised me the most was how seamless it seemed to be for us to go through this period of just hardship and heartbreak and loss. Even though there was no loss of life, there was loss of just the balance we had in our relationship, the loss of living life relatively carefree before cancer. If you're in life with cancer, you look back before cancer and you're like, "Oh my goodness, life was so much easier back then" even though there are probably things that felt hard. So I think what was actually the good thing was that we were able to sit back and be supported by how strong our relationship was before he had cancer. And I think that's the problem oftentimes when you're a caregiver of someone who you're in a relationship with. If your relationship wasn't strong, don't expect for it to automatically become stronger when you're under this, because you really see how people are when they're under this much stress.”

-Charlotte Bayala

“I have put people through just a five minute breathing exercise, and who have never breathed before other than normal breathing. Have never done yoga, have never meditated, just normal people who are caregivers. And when they finished, it always surprises me. It's like what keeps me going, is the look on their face when I bring them back out of it. And they're like, "I thought you said five minutes. That felt like a half hour. I felt like I just had a nap." It's just so awesome to see how, if someone can learn just how to breathe, how much better they feel. And the problem with caregiving is, we don't feel well. And maybe we didn't feel well before we were a caregiver either. I don't know. Some people could have had stressful, hectic lives before they became a caregiver.

And so for me, breathing especially is free. It's free. It's under your control at all times. So for me, if I can teach someone how to breathe, I can teach them how to find joy in small moments throughout their day. So to try breathing would be the first step I would say, because that's fairly simple. You don't need a lot of instruction to learn how to just do deep breathing.”

-Charlotte Bayala

00:00:00 Intro

00:03:19 When Charlotte’s husband got sick

00:06:58 From spouse to caregiver

00:08:33 Caregiver mental health

00:10:14 Caregiving – the first six months

00:12:41 Mourning “the way things used to be”

00:15:09 Breath control as a stress detoxifier

00:18:07 Family dynamics and caregiving

00:20:54 Active vs passive approach to caregiving

00:22:48 Importance of being very clear how others can help you

00:29:00 Advocating for yourself as a caregiver

00:30:23 Long-term caregiving

00:33:07 Finding a new normal

00:35:47 How spousal love evolves when caregiving

00:43:14 Feeling like running away is normal

00:46:47 Self-care, yoga, meditation, and breath work

00:51:17 The role of meditation in caregiving

00:56:29 Meditation, yoga, breath work: Only pick one!

00:59:58 Caregiving groups and communities

01:04:18 How healthcare providers don’t offer much support to caregivers

01:08:33 Charlotte’s podcast success

01:13:53 Caregiving final thoughts

01:16:25 Show Close

#011

Paul Tyler on All about Annuities and How They Fit Into Your 401K and Retirement Plans

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“Everybody owns an annuity, Matt. You know what that annuity is? It's called Social Security. We've all been paying into this thing, we've (been) taxed all the way up until we stop working. And when you turn 62, you can start taking Social Security. It is an “annuity,” meaning it will pay you a guaranteed sum of money until you pass away.

-Paul Tyler

Paul Tyler is the Chief Marketing Officer at Nassau Financial Services and the host of That Annuity Show, a podcast helps advisors explain the benefits of annuities.

This episode of The Matt Feret Show will give you an insider’s view into annuities. What annuities are, how annuities fit into your retirement plans, annuities and 401ks, how to buy an annuity, when to buy an annuity, how much annuity you need to buy one and a whole lot more.

Paul Tyler on All about Annuities and How They Fit Into Your 401K and Retirement Plans

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“Annuities are not investments, they are insurance."

-Paul Tyler

I tend to explain these (annuities) or when people start to ask about the types, we really talk about…what are the needs you're trying to meet? And (I’m) saying needs can be met with a fixed or variable contract, in a lot of circumstances. I'll give you a couple examples, but really the most important thing before you go down this annuity rabbit hole is, do a financial plan, understand what your cash flow needs will be, and more importantly, what could they be?

-Paul Tyler

“A lot of the annuities have low minimums, ours is $5,000; I think there are some as low as $2,000. I think it would be wonderful if we could take this down to $100 at some point in the future, because I think that would encourage people to save more with insurance, we're not quite there yet as an industry.”

-Paul Tyler

“The Secure Act opened a really interesting opportunity for people to save more for retirement. I won't go into the history… but about two years ago, the Secure Act was passed, and 401ks are great, however, they just haven't made up for the pensions they're replacing. If you look at 401k balances today, yes, participation rates are going up, but it's shocking how low the balances are in a lot of people's accounts. And people don't understand that, "It feels like I've got a lot of money in this account." But when you start to say, "Well, if I really need to live off that when I'm retired, how much is this?"

-Paul Tyler

00:00 Intro

02:31 Paul Tyler’s Experience

03:26 Annuity Basics

04:44 Annuities and Mortality Risk

06:10 Fixed vs Variable Annuity

07:44 Annuities and Financial Planning

11:32 Annuity Fees

13:23 Annuity Returns and Liquidity Options

15:01 Single Premium Annuities

16:34 Annuities or Bank CD?

18:34 Annuities and 401k Plans

21:27 Good Online Annuity Resources

24:22 Annuity Experts

25:21 Annuity Seminars

30:27 Show Close

#010

Bryan Herdt on Everything You Need to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

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“When's the right time to buy long-term care insurance? Here's the perfect time to buy long-term care insurance: When you're as young and as healthy as you're ever going to be, and somebody brings it to your attention. That's a winner right there. That's the time. It might be when you're 52 and it might be when you're 72. But it's never too late.”

-Bryan Herdt

Bryan Herdt, CSA, CMP a long-term care insurance agent and agency owner who has been selling long-term care insurance solutions for over twenty years.   

This episode of The Matt Feret Show will give you a very comprehensive insider’s view into long-term care insurance.  What it is, how many flavors there are, when to buy it, the differences in long-term care for people with insurance, what to buy, how to buy, caregivers and how to talk to your parents about long term care and long term care for veterans.

Bryan Herdt on Everything You Need to Know About Long Term Care Insurance

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“The life expectancy of a caregiver is shorter than that of a care-needer. Caring for somebody that needs care kills people. Fact. So the greatest gift you could give your family is the tools to help make that event a little bit easier for them so that when you are no longer to perform your duty, you're not leaving this incredible burden on the people that you care about the most.”

-Bryan Herdt

“Everybody's healthy until they're not. That is the hardest part of long-term care planning because, Matt, as you know, it comes with a great amount of denial. This event is very difficult to talk about. People have a hard enough time talking about life insurance and the ratio for risk of that (death) is pretty good, right?

The emotion that is brought out in people about losing their independence and losing the ability to self-manage is horrifying enough that people will just... They'll just dismiss it. They'll just say I just don't see it happening to me. And honestly, still, that's probably one of the biggest reasons why more don't do proactive planning for long-term care.”

-Bryan Herdt

“A short term care product is really designed for people that really understand when you look at statistics on long-term care… really the risk is maybe about three years. Are there people that outlive a three year plan? Oh yes. Especially dementia and Alzheimer's. Average length of claim is maybe six to eight years.

But for men and women … the average claim is about maybe 2.7 years for men and maybe a little over three years for women. Some people say, "Look, I don't want a five foot plank over a 10-foot ditch. And I don't want a 20 foot one either. Can you build me something that's adequate that will give me a couple of years of benefits that will give me integrated care, integrated care, home care, assisted living, community care, skilled care. So no matter what level of care I need that money will pay out?"

Yes, and maybe the premium is more practical, and maybe the underwriting is a little bit more liberal because I do have a few speed bumps in my health. And I may not be able to qualify for a traditional long-term care plan. Yes, and the sales of short-term products have skyrocketed over the last 10 years.”

-Bryan Herdt

When we survey and we talk to our clients about why did (they) decided to buy long-term care insurance, their response is very interesting. Number one response we get, nine out of ten times: “I do not want to become an imposition on my family.”

Number two, you would think it would be, "I'd like to protect our assets." Nope. Number two is, “I want access to quality care.” That’s number two, because they've seen some direct or indirect experience with family or friends who have had to make a choice based on the quality of the care based on how much they could afford. That doesn't always go well. And if it does go well, it may only go well for a segment of time.

-Bryan Herdt

00:00:00 Intro

00:03:58 Bryan’s background and experience

00:04:54 The history of long term care

00:09:04 Evolution of long term care insurance

00:10:12 What is long term care insurance?

00:11:48 The percentage of people who will need long term care insurance

00:13:46 Denial and long term care

00:22:04 Medicaid, long term care and facility quality

00:29:24 Financial planners and long term care knowledge

 

00:33:14 The cost of long term care insurance

00:39:40 The three “versions” or “flavors” of long term care insurance

00:43:13 When to buy long term care insurance

00:47:26 Who buys long term care insurance

00:51:38 Self-insuring vs. using insurance and quality of care

00:52:46 Probability of needing care starts at home

00:55:09 Neighborhood residential care homes

00:55:09 Caregivers how to talk to your parents about long term care

01:01:59 Paying for your parent’s long term care

01:03:10 The rapid aging of the population

01:03:10 How to start and who to talk to about long term care

01:09:46 Other types of insurance if I can’t qualify for long term care insurance

01:13:47 Veterans and long term care

01:17:07 Bryan’s phone number (yes, he gave it out!)

01:19:53 Show Close

#009

Joan Price on Ageless Sex and Dating

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“It's ageism in this country, and it is ageism of a particular kind. It's what I call the “ick factor,” and that is that people younger than we are, they'll think of seniors having sex and they'll go, "Eew, eew, how disgusting, how ludicrous." They'll make jokes about older people who are interested in sex, "Oh, look at that old coot and why does he just lock himself up?" "Oh, look at her. Who'd want her?”

It is a really terrible thing because we don't age out of sex and we have to unlearn those lessons that we're taught by our society that if we are desirous of sex, that we are icky and creepy and need to be just rolled up in the rug and put out. That's part of my work is helping people unlearn that. Of course, I would say to young people, "At what age do you plan to retire your genitals?"

-Joan Price

Joan Price is an author, educator and self-described advocate of ageless sexuality who loves helping people have and maintain healthy sex lives throughout their lives, but especially as they grow older.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into sex as we age, with your partner, by yourself, sex when you’re single, dating websites, sex after the death of a spouse, hormones, scheduling sex, and a whole lot more.

Joan Price on Ageless Sex and Dating

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“If one partner is insisting on things that just no longer serve you, then it might be really important to see a counselor, see a sex-positive and age-positive counselor, they're not all that way, or a certified sex therapist, if the partner is willing to go and to get some help, to get some help on the communication, get some help and seeing how important it is going forward, because there's great intimacy that comes with sex and great sex that comes with intimacy. If you are cutting off that lifeline to the intimacy in your relationship, then it can be seriously destructive.”

-Joan Price

“There are people who feel guilt, survivor's guilt, because how can I move on? I promised faithfulness until death, but realize, and I don't mean this to seem harsh, please. I have great compassion. I've been there. I am there. You promised, you promised faithfulness until death. You didn't promise that you would be only with that person or with the memory of that person for the rest of both your lives, even if death did take one of you. I want to say to you, Matt, when you said you don't want to imagine what it would be like to lose your wife. I don't want you to imagine that, but I do want you to do this. I do want you to sit down with your wife and say, "When one of us loses the other, hopefully, not for a very long time, but can we have the conversation now? Can we give each other our blessing to go forth when it feels like you're ready and to share joy and love with someone else?"

This is the greatest gift you can give each other, because one of the things I encounter over and over and over from people who contact me and I hear from grievers a lot, and I sometimes do personal consultations with grievers who are feeling, "I don't know how to move past this feeling that I would betray my wife, my husband, my partner, if I was sexual with someone else." If you can give that gift of saying, "I give you my blessing. I want you to find joy again. I want you to find love again."

-Joan Price

0:00 Intro

1:31 Joan as an Advocate for Ageless Sexuality

4:04 Ageism and Sex

5:47 Sex at 55, 65, 75

9:12 Being Open-minded

10:26 Society's Idea of Desire

11:22 Physical Changes as We Age

14:17 When One Partner Shuts Down

16:10 When Sex Therapy May Help

18:35 Single Older Adults and Sex

23:54 Sex After Grief

28:21 Survivor's Guilt and Sex

33:09 The Importance of Scheduling Sex

39:11 Getting Out of a Rut

42:20 Finding a Good Sex Therapist

51:31 Show Close

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