Bryan Kiefer on Independent Pharmacists, Pharmacies, and Caregiver Advice
Todd Morrissey on Medicare, HSAs, MSAs, IRMAA and Financial Planning
Erika Pimentel on Maintaining Fitness as You Age, the Importance of Weight and Core Training for Balance, Nutrition and Meal Plans, Online Training Programs versus In-Person Assessments, Fad Diets, Food and Exercise
Honorée Corder on Strategic Book Coaching, How to Write a Book, Self-Publishing vs. Traditional, Monetizing Your Book and More.

#008

Bryan Kiefer on Independent Pharmacists, Pharmacies, and Caregiver Advice

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“You still have to give personal service just like if there was a competition right across the street. I don't think you should ever let your guard down on that. Always treat your customers right. Treat them like family. Really the biggest challenges we have are maybe in the wintertime when it snows or ices and we can't get the our deliveries of our medication in. Sometimes when it's really bad out it's kind of nice that the local police and sheriff's departments will actually come and deliver our medicines to the patients if they can't get out. I mean, that's something you really don't see in the city. That's pretty nice. Everybody just helps each other out. It's a good experience. It's a good community.”

-Bryan Kiefer, RPh

Bryan Kiefer, RPh, is a pharmacist, independent pharmacy owner and board member of the Missouri Pharmacy Association.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into independent pharmacists and pharmacies, the role independent pharmacists play in rural America, how to actually talk to and use your pharmacist, why using cash or drug discount cards instead of insurance might lead to dangerous drug interactions, and some really good advice for caregivers or kids trying to help their parents with their medications.

Bryan Kiefer on Independent Pharmacists, Pharmacies, and Caregiver Advice

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“There's a girl I know who has a child with a liver transplant. And she can't get her medications filled at her local pharmacy. She has to rely on mail order. And so you got a kid with a transplanted liver relying on meds being sent through the mail. And sometimes she gets them and they're hot, in the summertime. It's sad. And oh my gosh. She's fighting all the time. It's ridiculous. But nope, no one can fill them but her mail order, specialty pharmacy.”

-Bryan Kiefer, RPh

“Make sure that your loved ones are being taken care of. Find the local pharmacy there that will deliver to your mom and dad that can put it in compliance packaging, then make sure that they take it every month.”

-Bryan Kiefer, RPh

  • Bryan’s role as owner/operator [2:55]
  • Pharmacy as a community center [3:45]
  • Independent pharmacies going strong [6:36]
  • Filling prescriptions in rural America [8:48]
  • Challenges of filling prescriptions [10:59]
  • Mail order prescription problems [12:32]
  • What Bryan would change if he could [18:26]
  • Independent pharmacy contracts [22:55]
  • Caregiver advice [26:36]

#007

Todd Morrissey on Medicare, HSAs, MSAs, IRMAA and Financial Planning

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“One (issue) I see quite commonly, and that is somebody who maybe is 68, maybe 70, and they've been working this entire time and they received some bad information when they were 65 and they signed up for Medicare Part B. So to them, they have employer coverage, healthcare coverage, and evidently they've been paying their Part B premium just thinking, "Well, that's what I was supposed to do." And now they want to decide to retire. And if they decide a Medicare Supplement plan is something that they want to purchase, that can be a hindrance if they can't qualify underwriting-wise because they've gone through their open enrollment period. Six months has been basically exhausted."

-Todd Morrissey

 

Todd Morrissey is President of Medicare Solutions at Advisors Excel. Advisors Excel is a nationwide firm based out of Topeka. It helps independent financial professionals, advisors, and wealth managers build independent practices.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into why financial planners, wealth managers and their firms haven't typically gotten very involved in Medicare insurance coverage. But, that's changing and Todd reviews why it's very important to start planning for Medicare well before age 64, how taxes and IRMAA play a part of the equation as well as MSAs and HSAs.

Todd Morrissey on Medicare, HSAs, MSAs, IRMAA and Financial Planning

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“The other one is some people think if you're on an HSA plan and you're going to be turning 65 that you have to sign up for Part A, because it says, well, it doesn't cost you anything. Well, you don't have to sign up for Part A, because again, you can't make contributions to your HSA account if you have any part of Medicare. And unfortunately we see people make a slip up in that particular arena. But the other one that has come up, when you leave employer coverage, from a Part D standpoint, you have 63 days to make an election for your prescription drugs. It's 63 days. There's a lot of people who miss that window. And now all of a sudden if you miss that window, there's some potential penalties that they could have. We get calls a lot to say, "How can you help us?" And that's another topic that we do here that we try to help the clients and the financial advisor help his clients with.”

-Todd Morrissey

“A lot of people, I mentioned the HSAs, a lot of things with HSAs signing up for Part A; you cannot make contributions to your HSA account if you have any part of Medicare, and that's a whole other conversation to get into. But again, just another planning mechanism that advisors have with their clients.”

-Todd Morrissey

 “A lot of people don't have an IRMAA charge, but there are some clients who do. And I will tell you this. When they get that notice from Social Security or Medicare that says, "Hey, this is what your Part B premiums are and your D." Sometimes it's sticker shock and they always say, "Well, why didn't you tell me about this?" That's why financial planners are there to basically help them guide them and inform them.”

-Todd Morrissey

  • Todd’s (lack of) hair. 😊  [3:09]
  • Financial Planners and Medicare [4:48]
  • What Medicare insurance people are buying now [8:18]
  • Medigap High Deductible G as an option [11:11]
  • Medicare Savings Accounts [13:19]
  • Medicare and HSAs [21:24]
  • Working past 65 and Medicare timing [23:33]

#006

Erika Pimentel on Maintaining Fitness as You Age, the Importance of Weight and Core Training for Balance, Nutrition and Meal Plans, Online Training Programs versus In-Person Assessments, Fad Diets, Food and Exercise

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“If you're getting into the stages of your life where are closer to retirement, it's never too late to start. And if you have a hard time starting, pair up with a workout buddy. The older we get, it is harder to sometimes find that motivation. And some days it's easier than others. So finding somebody that you would enjoy working out with, taking long walks. And it doesn't have to be... And this is another thing that I want to bring up. Sometimes people feel like they have to work out for two, three hours. You don't. I tell my clients, my clients who wait train with me, they want to do cardio in between. I say, "Look, if you give me 30 minutes of a good quality cardio workout, you do not need to be on that machine, whatever it is that you're going to do, for hours on end."

-Erika Pimentel

Erika Pimentel holds a Ph.D. in Human Nutrition and is a NASM-certified personal trainer who specializes in women's fitness.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into maintaining fitness as you age, the importance of weight and core training for balance, nutrition and meal plans, online training programs versus in-person assessments, customization versus just getting started, fad diets, food and exercise, and a whole lot more!

Erika Pimentel on Maintaining Fitness as You Age, the Importance of Weight and Core Training for Balance, Nutrition and Meal Plans, Online Training Programs versus In-Person Assessments, Fad Diets, Food and Exercise

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“A lot of women start to transition and see changes that they don't understand why they're happening. I think we're not educated enough. The medical profession doesn't really prepare us or friends and family. It's not talked about enough, some of the changes that you can start to experience, and it's very frustrating. Women will get depressed. They're starting to gain weight. They've tried everything. They don't know what's going on.”

-Erika Pimentel

 

“Once you hit 40, between 40 and 50, you have a bigger decrease in lean muscle mass. It's just muscle atrophy. It's a normal process in the human body. It continues throughout your fifties, sixties, and seventies. But the biggest chunk is between mid-thirties to fifties. So one of the things that I think is critical is people understanding that if you are active, you are better able to maintain your lean muscle mass. There are studies that show that once you start experiencing some of that weight gain, late thirties, early forties, if you do not decrease your (daily) caloric intake by about 200, 300 calories, you will see that weight gain unless you're active, unless you're doing something proactively. So it is a part of human nature, I guess, for you to start seeing some of those changes. It's what you do about them, what's going to be the end result. Will you gain weight? Will you able to maintain your weight?”

-Erika Pimentel

“It has become very confusing. That's part of the problem. People get bombarded with too many different options. I don't know if I'm one of the few out there that still believes this, but for me, I do not believe in fad diets because of the fact that our human body is designed to use protein, fat and carbohydrate. We need all three. Now what are the best ratios for each person? I really do believe that depends on the stage of your life that you're in. So you do have to adjust a little bit, as you age, those proportions.”

-Erika Pimentel

 

“Well, and it's great that you bring that 1.2 (grams of protein per pound of body weight) up because you will see tables. If you were to Google it, you're going to see tables that show 1.2 grams per pound. But we were taught in the way that I even learned it when I was in school studying for nutrition is you don't use per pound, you should use per kilogram of body weight, which makes a huge difference. So if you're somebody who's just trying to maintain your weight, you're not active. You would do 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. If you're somewhat active, you can bump it up to one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight. If you're somebody who's really weight training, even if it's not heavy, but you're doing it three, four times a week, you can bump that up to 1.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.”

-Erika Pimentel

  • NASM Personal Training program description [2:57]
  • Women’s fitness, lean muscle mass and physical changes [5:52]
  • Weight training [9:36]
  • Gym vs. online vs. at-home workouts [12:09]
  • Carbohydrates, Protein, Fat [14:50]
  • Protein intake [16:43]
  • Workouts: starting from scratch [19:13]
  • “Celebrity” online trainers [21:44]
  • Don’t use the word “diet” [27:22]
  • Nutritionists legally allowed to provide meal planning [28:45]

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“One of our customers bought (Aloe Care) for his mom. His mom had been dealing with some health issues over the previous couple of months and had been to a doctor a few times. Just wasn't feeling right, tired, just not herself. Long story short, the son bought our unit, plugged it in, and the air quality indicator went off right away. And the gas fireplace, we came to find out, was admitting three, four, five times the amount of gas it should. Nobody had any idea. That's why mom wasn't feeling good. We picked it up, and of course he was able to get in touch with the gas company right away and get that fixed. So those are the sort of stories that we hear that really keep us going, right, and are so rewarding when you think about just trying to help people.”

-Paul Rooney

Paul Rooney is the Executive Vice President of Business Development at Aloe Care, a technology company that’s transforming the future of in-home elder care. Aloe Care’s Smart Hub with voice-activated offers access to 24/7 professional emergency response and built-in motion, temperature, and air quality sensors and a wearable Care Button to get help both inside and outside the home. Just plug it in, and it starts working, while their family app keeps remote caregivers connected.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into Aloe Care’s patented self-described “World’s Most Advanced Medical Alert System” and how it can help caregivers and other family members keep loved ones healthy and safe. Enjoy!

Paul Rooney on Remote Caregiving Using Aloe Care Advanced Medical Alert Systems

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“The motion activity, and that's not about what my mom's doing, it's just how she's doing. She's up and about doing her daily routines. I know that if there was an anomaly, the data's going to catch that, the machine learning, and it can alert me, "Mom's not moving around the house like she normally does on a Monday. Mom spent a lot more time in the bedroom this week than typical." And that's all about…using data to proactively identify potential health status, health issues before they turn into something more serious.”

-Paul Rooney

“We've tried to minimize, really, and stay away from wearables, because again, people just don't want to wear these things for the most part. So, we have a couple of devices that are placed strategically in the home that capture that motion and environmental data. So, no need to wear anything.”

-Paul Rooney

“We don't have cameras. They said, "We don't want cameras in the home." So that's kind of where a line was drawn. So no cameras, but I think what is interesting as more of the care evolves and the home becomes a center of care and more care is done virtually, I think we'll see gradually, maybe, progression in that, and the use of cameras, perhaps, at least for that virtual care so the physician and clinician can actually see somebody. But for now, there's definitely a hesitancy around cameras in the home, which I totally get.”

-Paul Rooney

“One of our original prototypes had the typical big, red help emergency button on it. We took that out (to test) and people were like, "Really? It has to be red and this big, embarrassing button? I mean, come on." So we said, "You know what? You're right. It doesn't have to look like that. Let's make it look kind of cool, so you can set it on the coffee table and it's almost like this conversation piece." Again, don't make me feel old. So we took a very different design approach.”

-Paul Rooney

  • Trying to improve the quality of life for the home-bound elderly, particularly people that live alone, dealing with chronic conditions [3:38]
  • Primary caregiver communication struggles [5:30]
  • Remote environmental monitoring example [7:19]
  • Remote caregivers [8:13]
  • Use for multiple family caregivers who live far away [12:03]
  • Introducing the concept to mom or dad [13:28]
  • Privacy and in-home technology integration [16:28]
  • Emergency vs. non-emergency delineation [18:37]

#004

Honorée Corder on Strategic Book Coaching, How to Write a Book, Self-Publishing vs. Traditional, Monetizing Your Book and More.

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“I can count at least 10 New York Times bestselling authors who have come to me and said, "I never made any money."

— Honorée Corder

Honorée Corder is a bestselling author and executive business coach. She combines her business acumen and twelve years of self-publishing experience to provide structure, strategy, and accountability to individuals who want to elevate their platform and create multiple streams of income from publishing their own books. Honorée’s coaching and books provide real-world, time-tested strategies. She shares step-by-step advice in a straight-forward, no-nonsense fashion for use today, to get desired results as soon as tomorrow.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into the art of self-publishing your book, how, why and when to use a strategic book coach, how to identify a legitimate book coach, monetizing your book, author earning potential of traditional vs. self-publishing, why the best time to start writing is NOW, royalties vs. advances, the creative writing process, the business side of self-publishing, plus a whole lot more.  You can find her on Instagram, on Twitter, Facebook and www.honoreecorder.com.  You can email her at honoree@honoreecorder.com  Enjoy!

Honorée Corder on Strategic Book Coaching, How to Write a Book, Self-Publishing vs. Traditional, Monetizing Your Book and More.

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“If you think that you have a book that would benefit the world, don't get in your own way and wait a year or 10 years to actually put pen to paper and write the book. Start working through the process.”

— Honorée Corder

“There's a lot that goes in to turning your words and your expertise and your education, your experience all in one form in a 50,000 to 100,000-word document, and then putting the polish on it. You want someone who understands the arc of a book to go and make sure that what you think you're explaining to someone is what you're actually explaining to them, right, because we make multiple leaps in our heads as experts from A to F like, oh, well, you do this and then this happens. And it's like wait a minute. Where was B?”

— Honorée Corder

“You can still write and publish your book in a weekend. You can still upload a Word document and create a cover yourself. It's just not going to be the workhorse that you want it to be. It's not going to be the quality book that you want it to be. Ultimately, it's not going to work as hard for you.”

— Honorée Corder

“What (traditional) publishers want to see is… Is your milkshake going to bring the sales to the yard? Are you going to be able to sell books? What they will do is give you a chunk of money. It could be as low as, I hope you're sitting down, $10,000, $30,000, which you then have to earn out at your 10%, 12%... you have to earn back that money. That's not free money.”

— Honorée Corder

“You don't want your book to be a best-selling book. You want it to be a best-earning book.”

— Honorée Corder

“There are companies that will produce a book for you, and you will pay for that, and then they will go through the mechanics of publishing for you, and then send you royalties, and for that, they will also keep a piece of the action. So, your royalties are a little higher than traditional publishing, but not as high as if you form your own company and retain all of those rights yourself. I don't believe that there's anyone just like me who does exactly what I do.”

— Honorée Corder

  • On what a strategic book coach does [3:18]
  • Have a plan before writing [5:15]
  • Determining and specifying what an author wants from a book [6:45]
  • Arc of a book and the hero’s journey [10:59]
  • Traditional vs self-publishing [16:00]
  • Financials and earning potential of traditional vs. self-publishing [18:18]
  • Publishing timeframes [23:04]
  • Author intellectual property rights [25:25]
  • How to identify a legitimate book coach [29:59]
  • Book distribution overview [34:08]

#003

Mike McDonough on Executive Recruitment for Boomers; Second and Third Careers, Remote-Work and Re-Skilling, Resumes and Job Market Opportunities for Older Adults.

Share This:

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

“Do you know why you're working at an older (age)? If it's because you need more money in your retirement plan, or you need to make ends meet, or what have you, I think sorting through the “why” is very, very important. There are jobs out there. This is an employee's market. If you want to work, you can find it.” - Mike McDonough

Mike McDonough is President and CEO of General Search and Recruitment, a firm that recruits for mid-level and C-level positions within a variety of areas, with a special focus on the insurance industry. Mike loves helping people land roles, is extremely passionate about helping people find new careers, is an avid swimmer and received his BA from Western Illinois.

This episode will give you an insider’s view into Mike’s approach to career management, re-skilling and how to go about thinking about second careers.

Mike McDonough on Executive Recruitment for Boomers; Second and Third Careers, Remote-Work and Re-Skilling, Resumes and Job Market Opportunities for Older Adults.

Listen to the episode on Apple PodcastsSpotify, Deezer, Podcast Addict, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Alexa Flash Briefing, iHeart, Acast or on your favorite podcast platform. You can watch the interview on YouTube here.

Brought to you by Prepare for Medicare – The Insider’s Guide  book series. Sign up for the Prepare for Medicare Newsletter, an exclusive subscription-only newsletter that delivers the inside scoop to help you stay up-to-date with your Medicare insurance coverage, highlight Medicare news you can use, and reminders for important dates throughout the year. When you sign up, you’ll immediately gain access to seven FREE Medicare checklists.

“I would advise them to play to their strengths. And that means do what they love doing. And if they want to do it part-time, they want to do it remotely, they want to do it in another part of the country; Clients can't find enough of you and you can really leverage the shortages in that age group to your advantage.”

— Mike McDonough

“I think it's wise for people to research where they're going and find out what they're walking into. And with social media, it gets a bad rap, but if you look at their website and you looked at their LinkedIn pages, you can figure out very, very quickly by looking at pictures, how diverse and how gray hair friendly a place might be.”

— Mike McDonough

“The big knock on the boomer age group was that they were stuck on their old successes too much. And the employers were afraid to hire them because they had all this baggage and stuff they needed to unlearn in the new world. Well, when they stopped talking about that and started talking about how they love to keep learning and growing, and they have the same passions, but with different wording, they started getting hired again, left over right, because their foundational work ethic was in place and their attitude of being cooperative became a little more heightened and easier to digest.”

— Mike McDonough

“Whatever those skills are that are uniquely yours, make sure that they jump off the page because people sometimes need to be reminded of what the strengths are in a resume. So don't worry about having more information. Try to have the right information and create interest. Think of a resume as an invite to a discussion, a problem-solving session, a chance to brainstorm and see if you two can solve that problem together.”

— Mike McDonough

  • Recruiter and job opportunities for ages 55-75 [2:34]
  • Ageism, succession planning, wage inflation [4:56]
  • Re-skilling with Excel [9:04]
  • How to tell what firms are gray hair friendly [11:01]
  • Mentally preparing for a second career [13:06]
  • Resume prep [15:47]
  • Resumes and LinkedIn [21:26]
  • Why being open to physically working in an office could get you hired [26:58]

Recent Podcasts

Subscribe

Prepare For Medicare

© Copyright 2022. MF Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved.